Written for Slipperieslope, one of the most generous friends anyone on LJ could have. She's a talented artist and an incredible person, proven by her so kindly asking for a Due South tale from the pov of the one with the tail. m/m slash for all mature readers.

 

Five Things that Diefenbaker never told Fraser
by Laura Mason

 

1. His ears aren't exactly healed, but he's not deaf. It's true he can't hear the range of sounds he remembers from cub days, but he can hear. He just prefers it when Fraser looks at him and speaks clearly. Then he knows it's important, and Dief can safely ignore Fraser the rest of the time. Really, if Ray had such a simple system, he wouldn't always be complaining about everything Fraser says.

Hmmm, if Dief could convince Ray to look him in the eye when it matters, so Dief didn't have to listen to all those complaints... But no, that man has never believed Diefenbaker is deaf, and he's not willing to give up first shot at the donut box (which he gets because he hears the waxed paper rustle) to convince Ray.

 

2. Victoria didn't have to shoot him. Or kick him afterwards. He growled at her, asking her to leave Fraser's trunk alone. But even when she took the gun, which he knew she shouldn't have, he wouldn't have attacked Fraser's mate. Dief keeps this all to himself because he understands guilt, though not as clearly as he now understands hate.

 

3. Fraser didn't remember the lasagna; he was staring out the window long after the Riveria pulled away, too upset to eat. And Fraser himself always says that good food shouldn't be wasted. Mrs. Vecchio's food is very good. Anyway, Diefenbaker made sure the plate was licked thoroughly, so it was clean when, days later, Fraser noticed it there and put it back in his cupboard.

 

4. Dief never says "I told you so." Fraser, sadly, often does. Even Ray is petty enough to do that after Dief has too many of the donuts Ray constantly tempts him into eating.

But Diefenbaker is polite -- in wolf fashion, he supposes, since humans frown on openly sniffing certain get-to-know-you areas. Prudishness. No common sense but lots of prudishness. But Dief has common sense, which is why he recognized the attraction. And Diefenbaker has manners, so the morning after they made a spectacle of themselves, howling louder than an entire pack, Dief never reminds either man that he's the one who tripped Ray at the strategic moment so he'd fall into Fraser and they'd both land on the bed.

 

5. There's no reason to tell Fraser, who seems upset enough about the one litter of cubs, but of course he has lots of other bitches and many families, here in Chicago and up north. It's not Diefenbaker's fault that Ray isn't able to give Fraser any little Mounties.

 

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